"Willing the self-preservation of herself and her unborn child, Rosemary becomes attuned to the duplicity of her surroundings: a barricaded closet, absent paintings on yellowed wallpaper, the chalky under-taste of a chocolate dessert. Congratulatory bouquets of flowers fill the apartment as a morbid curtain call; there’s only so much rot a charade can withstand."
1968 / JESSICA MOORE /
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Babette, the former chef of Cafe Anglais, shivers upon a doorstep in Jutland having fled Paris following its besiegement. 1871—aptly christened l’année terrible by Victor Hugo—is transforming the streets of the capital into those of gloom and conflict.
BABETTE'S FEAST / ISOBEL WISE / READ MORE
In the pool outside, two children play in the chlorine waters, distanced from those of Sydney Harbour which lack such disinfectant. Beyond the harbour, the city moves in a flurry and whir. Modern life is fast. It is mercenary. It is suits and heels and traffic lights. 
1971 / ISOBEL WISE / READ MORE
At a film set, Julie stands right of frame. The film crew parallels her position. The background is smothered in darkness similar to Julie’s apparel; her body blends into the space to illustrate her disconnection from reality; her sullen face glows beneath the twilight.
THE SOUVENIR / OLIVIA E. TAYLOR / READ MORE
In today’s imagination, 1968 is remembered as a year cloaked in the ethos of subversion—one characterised by the ubiquity of home-owned television sets, generational divide, and images of war, assassination, and protest. This social context ostensibly influenced film, including its reception and its production. 
1968 / JESSICA MOORE / READ MORE
Visuals of objects oscillate between the people who craft them, audio of interspersed conversation coats them with a sugary glaze. Like a child being lulled to sleep in patches of moving sun, the hum of women working is a familiar music.
FAKE FRUIT FACTORY / JESSICA MOORE / READ MORE
Two ravenous young women wander the streets of Paris in continual forage, looking to remedy their destitution. A borrowed apartment offers them rest. A diner, some bread and cigarettes. Together they visualise the hazy ritual of consumption, falling in and out of sync with every mouthful.
I'M HUNGRY, I'M COLD / JESSICA MOORE / READ MORE
“It’s better to eat porridge together than filet mignon alone.” These are the wise words of Birger: middle-aged, divorced and hopelessly lonely in a Stockholm suburb. The year is 1975.
2000 / EMMA OLSSON / READ MORE
In the pool outside, two children play in the chlorine waters, distanced from those of Sydney Harbour which lack such disinfectant. Beyond the harbour, the city moves in a flurry and whir. Modern life is fast. It is mercenary. It is suits and heels and traffic lights. 
1971 / ISOBEL WISE / READ MORE
Violence is utilised to combat the abusive relationships they are held in, while in the midst of “girlboss feminism” the women reject the heteronormative ideals of femininity thrust upon them.
2014 / CHARLOTTE MANSFIELD / READ MORE
Visualised by the ghostly carousels that continuously, surreally crop up in different locations, immobility consumes the narrative. Always moving yet unable to move forward, bodies collapse inward—feelings reside in flesh.
BETTY BLUE / JESSICA MOORE / READ MORE
Babydoll dresses in creams and shades of bubblegum and rose are paired with sandals and long-flowing hair. Borrowing Millie’s housecoats, Pinky starts to emulate her roommate’s actions and phrases, desperate to assimilate into her world. 
3 WOMEN / ISOBEL WISE / READ MORE